Great Canadian Parks / Ontario

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The Parks / Ontario / Point Pelee National Park


 


Over 700 species of flowering and non-flowering plants, some of which are found only in this region, thrive in the park's diverse landscape. In dry forest areas, where the predominant tree is the southern Hackberry, rope-like wild grape, Virginia creeper, and poison ivy vines hanging from the trees create a jungle effect. As the grasslands age, the red cedar, staghorn, dogwood and sumac move in, creating Red cedar savannah, the habitat of rare grasses and herbs such as wild potato vine and prickly pear cactus - now on the list of protected plants in Ontario. The open forest is made up of sycamore, generally found only in the Carolinian Zone, red mulberry, black walnut, red cedar, hop trees, tulip, honey locust, and blue ash. To the north, mixed wood includes some sugar maple, white pine and basswood. Lower swampy terrain produces silver maple, willow, cottonwood and dogwood. A sea of cattails and bulrushes stretches across the marshland, the brilliant white petals of water lilies float in open water and the hop tree, a representative of the citrus family found as far south as Mexico, finds its northernmost setting here. Only the hardiest plants survive on the beaches; above high water mark, colonies of plants grow in sand enriched by rotting plant and animal matter. Further up the beach, the deeply rooted lime grass, beard grass and witch grass contribute to soil stability.

 

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