Great Canadian Parks / Nova Scotia

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The Parks / Nova Scotia / Kejimkujik National Park



Of the approximately 205 bird species, the barred owl, about 20 species of woodland warblers, six species of woodpecker, including the huge pileated woodpecker and the very rare black-backed woodpecker, all frequent the vast interior wilderness. Salt marshes and tidal mud flats provide nutrient-rich feeding grounds for the scarlet tanager, the great crested flycatcher and the wood thrush, all southern species uncommon to Nova Scotia, along with the equally unexpected northerly species: chickadee, red-breasted nuthatch, spruce grouse and gray jay. The indented coastline provides a bountiful habitat for black ducks, common mergansers, cormorants, terns, guillemots and other shorebirds. About ten pair of piping plovers, considered endangered since 1985, nest within the park adjunct, where the nesting area is closed to public access and the nests themselves are fenced off against the raccoons, foxes and other predators that steal their exposed eggs. These precautions have met with some success.

 


Kejimkujik is by far the most important national park for reptiles in Atlantic Canada. Five snake, three turtle, five salamander, one toad and seven frog species inhabit the slow-moving rivers, streams, shallow lakes, bogs and marshes of the park. Warm summers and moderate winters account for the abundance and diversity of these species. The Blanding’s turtle was not discovered here until 1953 and by 1993 it was declared a threatened species in Nova Scotia with over 95% of their population established in the park. Research on hatchling survival, radio monitoring of their movements and efforts to protect nesting and mating sites from disturbance and predators are part of the park’s program to safeguard rare species which were once more widespread in eastern Canada, but are now restricted to this area.

 

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