Great Canadian Parks / Nova Scotia

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The Parks / Nova Scotia / Kejimkujik National Park



The rivers provide excellent homes for aquatic mammals such as the beaver that build their lodges on the banks of deep waterways, muskrats that live in holes in the riverbank, otters and mink, mainly fish-eaters that are rarely seen. Large mammals that can be seen along the shoreline or in grassy meadows include the dwindling populations of moose, the white-tailed deer, hare, black bear, bobcat, fox and porcupine. The increasing raccoon population around campgrounds is a menace to turtles that nest on nearby beaches, and especially to the survival of the rare Blandings turtle. In summer, harbour seals bask on the offshore frieze or haul out on the rocky points of the Seaside Adjunct. There are two species of flying squirrels and dozens of mouse, mole and shrew species that are seldom seen. The coyote is a new arrival, first sighted in both sections of the park in 1994, hunting in packs of 3 or 4. A highly adaptive predator, it hunts deer as well as hares and the smaller rodents. Since 1987, about 130 martens have been re- introduced from populations in New Brunswick in an effort to re-establish them after habitat disturbance and trapping eliminated them from Nova Scotia.

 

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