Great Canadian Parks / Nova Scotia

Page 1 2 3 4 5 Quiz

The Parks / Nova Scotia / Cape Breton National Park



The moose, successfully re-introduced to the area in 1947, the snowshoe hare, the white- tailed deer and the red squirrel are all typical boreal species. The elusive Canadian lynx enjoys protected status here and it is thought that the endangered eastern panther may have also found refuge in the wilderness regions of the high plateau. Other mammals in the park include otter, muskrat, mink and beaver along the valley streams, and the bobcat, raccoon and coyote that migrated to the island after the Canso Causeway joined Cape Breton to the mainland in 1955. Freshwater Lake is the only known site for the true valve snail. The rock voles found in hardwood forests, the Gaspe shrew, a voracious creature, the pygmy shrew and pine martins, are all considered rare in Canada and all are protected in the park. Also sheltered are Nova Scotia's breeding population of bald eagles, which build huge nests and feed primarily on fish. Pilot whales approach the coastline in search of herring and mackerel, their main food source, and finback and minke whales, harbour porpoise and seal may be observed from the shore. Of the 229 species of birds, many are songbirds: warblers, finches, the greater yellowlegs and the uncommon grey- cheeked chickadees; some birds of prey include hawks, owls, merlin and kestrel; the seabirds in the park are gulls, terns, guillermots, cormorants, and ducks; in late summer, semipalmated sandpipers blacken the beaches and mud flats fueling up before migrating to South America. Along the Gulf shoreline, the carefully monitored schools of Atlantic salmon begin their return upriver on their spawning runs. Cape Breton Highlands is one of only four national parks in the world protecting breeding habitat of this internationally threatened species.



Page 1 2 3 4 5 Quiz