Great Canadian Parks / Northwest Territories

Page 1 2 3 4 5 Quiz

The Parks / Northwest Territories / Aulavik National Park



 


 

The 230 archaeological sites within the park date back 3400 years and include occupations by people of Pre-Dorset, Thule and Copper Inuit cultures. The Nasogaluak site on the Thomsen River has over 40 caches, subterranean houses, tent rings, a windbreak, surface artifacts and bone fragments. There are numerous remnants of the 4000-year-old Palaeo Eskimo culture such as their quartzite micro-blades used in the butchering of animals. The intriguing Head Hill site, on the north side of the Muskox River, contains caches as well as the skulls and splintered bones of over 540 muskoxen. The site was probably a major encampment for Copper Inuit from 1855 to 1890, used while en route to their salvaging of the British ship the Investigator, which was abandoned on Mercy Bay. In the early 1900’s, the arctic fox pelts attracted Inuvialuit trappers from the Mackenzie Delta, Victoria Island, the Tuktoyuktuk Peninsula and Alaska’s north slope. The first record of European visitation was during the search for the Northwest Passage through the Arctic, when Sir John Franklin and his crew were lost. British expeditions searched the archipelago but no trace was ever found. One of the search parties, led by Robert McClure, became trapped in the ice of Prince of Wales Strait. Freed from the ice the following spring, he continued his search around Banks Island only to again become ice-locked, this time in Mercy Bay. After enduring two winters here and facing inevitable starvation, he and his men set out across the ice. Miraculously they were found and rescued by a British vessel; their ship, the forsaken Investigator, became a source of iron and copper for the Copper Inuit from Victoria Island until it broke up and sank 50 years later.


Page 1 2 3 4 5 Quiz